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Since late March, St. Andrews University, a branch of Webber International University, has been on the precipice of utilizing a new hot water system for the campus that comes with a 96% thermal efficiency rating and is now functional and online.

“How can we ensure a stable supply of hot water for students and reduce operating costs?” That was the question that Glenn Batten, Vice President for Administration, posed to the engineers of Brady-Trane Services.  The campus hot water system had become unreliable, one of the large storage tanks had failed and the other was on borrowed time.  St. Andrews needed a cost effective solution.

Brady-Trane engineered and installed a new system based on state of the art technology.  Instead of one large boiler and a couple of 5,000 gallon storage tanks, the new system uses eight high efficiency boilers to produce an endless supply of hot water on demand. 

The expected outcome of the project is that energy savings will pay for the project.  Batten said, “The old system was only about 20 to 30 percent efficient.  This meant that 70 to 80 cents of every dollar spent on producing hot water went straight up the flue.  The new system has a 96% thermal efficiency rating and since we only produce hot water when needed the payback is very quick. This a great example of a green initiative project that is good for the environment and good for the budget.”

Batten focuses on major improvements with the new system:  paid for by energy savings, replaces old equipment, advanced technology and provides for better student comfort.

 

 

 

Photo:  (l-r) Lindsey Trockenbrot, Cailey Culp, Samantha Gallo, Shelby Balmas, Sarah Beth Felker, Hannah Newman, Annie Owen, Gina Ulveie, Maggie Martin, Coach Carla Wennberg

 

   In an unusual geographic assignment and task for the St. Andrews Western team that might have sent them to either Ocala, FL or Findlay, OH, their trip was to Wellsville, Utah, for the Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association (IHSA) Western Semi-Finals.

    In competition including the eventual champion Oregon State University, St. Andrews once again was up against much larger schools including the U. of Cincinnati, University of Wisconsin, Northern Kentucky University, Utah State University and Rocky Mountain College.  St. Andrews would finish sixth.   

    Team members included Gina Uleive (7th reining), Sarah Beth Felker (6th in Open Horsemanship), Hannah Newman (5th Advanced Horseman), Maggie Marti (4th Novice), Shelby Balma (4th Intermediate) and Samantha Gall (4th walk).

    However, earning a trip to the national finals in Syracuse, NY, were individual winners Sarah Beth Felker (3rd in Open Horsemanship) and Annie Owen (7th Open Horsemanship) out of 15.  Gina Uleive was the High Point Regional rider and also earned a spot at nationals as region High Point.

    Western Coach Carla Wennberg said, “My team did a great job for the experience level they had going into the Utah semi-finals.  It was a big step up for us and many on the team had never had the competition experience to handle the competition.  It’s been a rebuilding year, plus the struggles with the weather and events from last fall so our preparation has been different.” 

    She added, “Utah State University was an amazing host, great facility, beautiful setting and great horses.  Amazing for our students to fly to a competition.  Overwhelming, too.  Winning is part of the plan, but the journey is the success ultimately.”

    Next stop for Coach Wennberg, Felker and Uleive is Syracuse where once again, St. Andrews will be represented on the national Western finals equestrian stage. 

 

   St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

 

{The following story about St. Andrews alumna Reeta Roy ‘86 appeared in the Toronto Star, Canada.  It was written by Catherine Porter.  St. Andrews has received permission to reprint it in its entirety by following the link.}

 

How a mother’s gamble sparked thousands of scholarships

 

  Two themes run through Reeta Roy’s family story. One is hard work; the other is migration.

  Roy’s father, Durgadas, grew up in Dhaka, then capital of India’s Eastern Bengal province. During the 1947 Partition, the Hindu family fled as refugees to Calcutta, where Durgadas was studying medicine. After graduating, without telling his parents, he hopped a boat to Malaysia, where he had heard that good jobs awaited.

    Reeta Roy is president and CEO of the Toronto-based MasterCard Foundation, the largest private foundation in Canada. “You want every child to go to school on an even playing field,” she says…

 

https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2016/05/08/how-a-mothers-gamble-sparked-thousands-of-scholarships.html

   What a difference a year makes!  Last April, St. Andrews had been selected as one of 19 recipients (out of 60 proposals) for the PepsiCo Recycling Zero Impact fund and received funding for a collaborative campus venture among the Student Government Association, Office of Student Affairs and SAU Leadership.  The grant would be used to initiate a campus-wide recycling project that the Green Knight Initiative Committee would oversee.

   Jump to March, 2019, and the results of that recycling venture on campus powered by the Green Knight Initiative are on course to divert an estimated 60,000 lbs. of recyclable materials from the Scotland County landfill.  Housing and Residence Life Director Clifton Dial and SGA President Eduardo Andrade ‘19 have been in communication with Scotland County Solid Waste to ensure that recycling efforts meet the requirements of the local municipality.

   The success of the campus program was furthered by St. Andrews representation at the

Carolina Recycling Association’s 28th Annual conference on March 18 at the Citadel in Charleston, SC.   Dial and Andrade presented the recycling program development story of SAU recycling and participated in round table discussions with other universities such as the Citadel, USC, Appalachian State, Clemson, UNC Chapel Hill, and NC State.  

   SAU alum BJ Tipton ’85, who is the head of UNC Chapel Hill’s Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling, was at the conference and shared her reactions with President Paul Baldasare Jr. ’77 about St. Andrews presentation.  “I have to tell you what a great job Eduardo and Clifton did at the Carolina Recycling Association’s Collegiate Recycling Coalition workshop this past week at the Citadel.  They gave the best presentation of all—and that’s not just my opinion.  Their approach to the recycling program and grant request was great. They were able to talk about all the right details of getting a program off the ground and maintaining support for it—from working with the collection staff, to visiting the processing facility, working with the city, and selecting bags!  They were spot on.  Again, you are very lucky to have such committed, articulate, and professional representatives for St. Andrews. They made me proud!”

   President Baldasare added his congratulations.  “The response from BJ Tipton is the highest praise!  As the head of recycling at UNC Chapel Hill, BJ is considered one of higher education’s most knowledgeable and successful recycling leaders.  For her to be so impressed with your work is an amazing stamp of approval.  Thanks for all that you’ve done and will continue to do to keep us focused on recycling.”

   The Green Knight Initiative hopes to finish up the year strong with the Scotland County Green School Jam on April 17 and an SAU Earth Day celebration on April 28.

   St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.  The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.—30—

  Now in its 35thyear, one of the Science Olympiad’s regional competitions will be held at St. Andrews University on March 30.  Junior high students from nine different school across the Carolinas will compete in events from Anatomy and Physiology to Battery Buggy.  Beginning at 9 a.m., 23 events will be held.  However, the best part of the event is sure to be the awards ceremony.  Teammates from each school excitedly cheer one another on.  The top teams will advance to the state competition held in Raleigh, NC.

   In an effort to gain prospective students, as well as encourage junior high and high school students to get excited about science, the Science Olympiad was born.  On Nov. 23, 1974, 15 schools from across the Carolinas and Virginia traveled to (then) St. Andrews Presbyterian College to compete in the first ever Science Olympiad.  The brainchild of the Division of Natural Science, Mathematics and Health Science, this event promoted fun and learning in areas such as biology, chemistry, physics and engineering.

   Word of this event spread from state to state.  In 1983, John Cairns, a teacher from Delaware, with help from Dr. Gerald Putz, a school district consultant in Michigan, realized the importance of sharing this event with the nation.  Dr. Putz, also a retired Army Lieutenant Colonel, sought funding from the U.S. Army.  After a leadership seminar to determine level of interest, the U.S. Army agreed to sponsor the first ever Science Olympiad National Tournament. It was held in May, 1985, at Michigan State University with 17 states participating. 

   It’s hard to believe that such an exceptional competition got its roots in the U.S. at St. Andrews.  Currently, the Science Olympiad hosts over 450 tournaments a year with over 8,000 teams competing in all 50 states.  This year the National Science Olympiad competition will be held in Ithaca at Cornell University.  Next year the national competition comes home as the event will be hosted by North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

   The love of science runs deep at St. Andrews, from its expansive John Blue Lab to the faculty who meticulously put together science related events.  Rooney Coffman, Director of Logistics, who has seen the evolution of the event over the years, couldn’t be prouder that it continues to foster the love of science in young minds.  It goes to show how a small idea born inLaurinburg can have an enormous impact on the nation.

 

(This release was written by Kaitlyn Lomax, a senior communications major, assisting Dr. Henery as a COM 454 practicum study.)​

St. Andrews University, a branch of Webber International University, was among 24 North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities that competed in the recent Ethics Bowl held Feb. 8-9 at the North Carolina Legislative complex in Raleigh. St. Andrews students collectively explored the theme of “Ethics and the Environment.”  Under the guidance of campus coordinators Dr. Tanner Capps and Dr. Tim Verhey, this debate experience came as part of a St. Andrews Demi I course called “Debating Ethical Dilemmas,” an innovative new class that introduces students to ethical concepts and public argument through teamwork and academic collaboration.  Tharyn French, Kerri Paschal, Lydia Randell, Eduardo Andrade, Timothy Aiken and Steffan Johnson represented St. Andrews.

    “The Ethics Bowl is both academically challenging and personally rewarding experience for our students,” said NCICU president Hope Williams. “Determining ethical responses to complex situations leads to personal awareness and valuable discussion among team members and participating business and community leaders.”

   Each Ethics Bowl team consisted of four-to-six students for the four rounds of competition that last over two days with semi-final and final rounds. Approximately 60 business, non-profit and government professionals served as judges and moderators.

   Participating colleges and universities included Barton College, Belmont Abby College, Campbell University, Catawba College, Chowan University, Gardner-Webb University, High Point University, Johnson C. Smith University,Livingstone College, Louisburg College, Mars Hill University, Meredith College, Montreat College, North Carolina Wesleyan College, Queens University of Charlotte, St. Andrews University, Saint Augustine’s University, Salem College, University of Mount Olive, Wake Forest University, William Peace University and Wingate University

   Ethics Bowl Sponsors included Ads Infinitum, BB&T, BDO USA LLP, Blackman & Sloop CPA, Catering Works, Cherry Bekaert, Melanie Chrisp-Thorpe, Coca-Cola Bottling Co., Colleen Kinser, CORT, Dominion Energy, Duke Energy, Enterprise Holdings, Fidelity Investments, First American Education Finance, HRP, International Textile Group, Ketchum, McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture, Mount Olive Pickle Co., Piedmont Natural Gas, Steve and Liz Riley, SunTrust Bank, Theo Davis Printing, TIAA, Wells Fargo, Hope Williams, and Womble Bond Dickinson.

   St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.—30—

[St. Andrews University, a branch of Webber International University, was among one of the 33 teams that achieved Scholar All-America status for the first time. To receive this honor, the team is required to obtain a 3.0 or higher GPA for the fall semester.  Information about this recognition was provided by the College Swimming and Diving Coaches Association of America news release.]

   The College Swimming and Diving Coaches Association of America (CSCAA) Colorado Springs, CO, has selected a record 713 teams from 460 institutions to the Scholar All-America Team for the Fall 2018 semester.  The teams were selected by the CSCAA’s Scholar All-America committee on the basis of their Fall grade point averages and represent 16,502 student-athletes.  

   Thirty-three teams achieved Scholar All-America status for the first time, reflecting the continued growth of swimming and diving.  “The narrative is that swimming and diving is on the decline, but in reality, colleges and universities have added 100 teams since 2015,” according to CSCAA Executive Director Greg Earhart.  “Presidents and athletic directors recognize that swimmers and divers are excellent students and ambassadors for their institutions.”

   Liberty University (Division I) had the highest GPA of all women’s teams.  The Flames earned an average GPA of 3.79.  Among men’s programs, MIT (Division III) took the top spot with a 3.78. 
   Women’s divisional leaders included Biola (3.72) and Saint Catherine’s (3.75) in Division II and III respectively. SCAD-Savannah (3.61) and Indian River (3.45) were tops among NAIA and NJCAA women’s programs. 
   For the men, Grand Canyon (3.68) repeated last Fall’s ranking as the top Division I men’s program.  In Division II Bridgeport led the way with a 3.72.  Like the women, SCAD-Savannah’s men (3.48) were number one among NAIA programs (which includes St. Andrews). Iowa Central (3.10) topped the NJCAA.  
   Teams excelled both in the school and the pool with 89% of teams in the CSCAA TYR Top 25 earning the honor.  Those teams included the top-ranked California men (3.05), Texas women (3.55), Queens (NC) women (3.63), Indianapolis men (3.34) and Denison men (3.26) and women (3.31). 
   To earn the honor, teams with student-athletes were required to post a GPA of 3.0 or higher for the fall semester.

   St. Andrews men’s roster includes Brandon Williams ’22, Caden Wendelin ’21, Jack Vincent ’22, Jamal Walling ’22, Nolan Walling ’22 and Quentin Cooper, ’20.  The women’s roster includes Chiara Knebelkamp ’20, Erica Hocum ’21 and Jaidi Dubose ’22.

   Both teams are coached by head coach Taylor Cooper and assistant coach Kurt Wohlrab.