Latest News

In this role, Dr. Walker joins the board of directors for the national organization whose members include cardiovascular and pulmonary physicians, nurses, exercise physiologists, physical therapists, behavioral scientists, respiratory therapists, dieticians and nutritionists, comprising about 4,000 members.  There are approximately 3500 cardiopulmonary rehab programs across the United States consisting of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals. 

Strategic Partners include The American Association for Respiratory Care, The American College of Cardiology, The American College of Sports Medicine, The American Heart Association, The American Thoracic Society, The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and The Medical Fitness Association.

Dr. Walker said, “For most of my career, I have been involved in the world of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation as an exercise physiologist.  I am thrilled for the opportunity to serve and give back to field that has been so good to me over the years. What is exciting is the real possibility of some of our sports performance, health, and fitness majors working in the field of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.” 

Founded in 1985, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation is dedicated to the mission of reducing morbidity, mortality and disability from cardiovascular and pulmonary disease through education, prevention, rehabilitation, research and disease management.  Central to the core mission is improvement in quality of life for patients and their families. 

St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

 

Appropriately, every Sept. 17 brings us to a national recognition of Constitution Day (once known as Citizenship Day) to celebrate the signing of the United States Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787.  Four years later, Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights and the first 10 Amendments were ratified (now 27).

The Constitution includes the Preamble, seven Articles with multiple sections, 4,400 words in total.  It is the oldest and shortest written Constitution of any major government in the world.  Since its creation, over 100 countries around the world have used it as a model for their own.

Since 1952, the Constitution has been on display in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.  Currently, all four pages are displayed behind protective glass framed with titanium.  To preserve the parchment's quality, the cases contain argon gas and are kept at 67 degrees Fahrenheit with a relative humidity of 40 percent.

James Madison proposed the U.S. Bill of Rights.  It largely responded to the Constitution's influential opponents, including prominent Founding Fathers, who argued that the Constitution should not be ratified because it failed to protect the basic principles of human liberty.  The U.S. Bill of Rights was influenced by George Mason's 1776 Virginia Declaration of Rights, the 1689 English Bill of Rights, works of the Age of Enlightenment pertaining to natural rights, and earlier English political documents such as the Magna Carta (1215).

Two additional articles were proposed to the States;  only the final 10 articles were ratified quickly and correspond to the First through Tenth Amendments to the Constitution.  The first Article, dealing with the number and apportionment of U.S. Representatives, never became part of the Constitution.  The second Article, limiting the ability of Congress to increase the salaries of its members, was ratified two centuries later as the 27th Amendment.

Though they are incorporated into the document known as the "Bill of Rights," neither article establishes a right as that term is used today.  For that reason, and also because the term had been applied to the first 10 Amendments long before the 27th Amendment was ratified, the term "Bill of Rights" in modern U.S. usage means only the 10 Amendments ratified in 1791.

One of the original 14 copies of the U.S. Bill of Rights is on public display at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

 

A few facts about the U.S. Constitution

  • Of the spelling errors in the Constitution, "Pensylvania" above the signers' names is probably the most glaring.
  • Thomas Jefferson did not sign the Constitution. He was in France during the Convention, where he served as the U.S. minister. John Adams was serving as the U.S. minister to Great Britain during the Constitutional Convention and did not attend either.
  • The Constitution was "penned" by Jacob Shallus, a Pennsylvania General Assembly clerk, for $30 (about $830 today).
  • The Constitution does not set forth requirements for the right to vote. As a result, at the outset of the Union, only male property-owners could vote. African Americans were not considered citizens, and women were excluded from the electoral process.  Native Americans were not given the right to vote until 1924.
  • James Madison, "the father of the Constitution," was one of the first to arrive in Philadelphia for the Constitutional Convention. He arrived in early May, bearing the blueprint for the new Constitution.

 

The 39 Signers and state each came from:

    St. Andrews, a branch of Webber International University, held their opening Convocation on Aug. 27 as a campus wide and community gathering on the first day of classes and kicked off the beginning of the 2019-2020 academic year. Harris Courts was filled with new students marching in, surrounded by hundreds of returning students, faculty, staff and community members.

    Students began assembling in front of Belk led by Pipe Major Bill Caudill and escorted by St. Andrews ​Marshal Dr. David Herr, Academic Dean Dr. Edna Ann Loftus, Mr. Loren Cornish, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Paul Baldasare Jr, Campus President.

    Dr. Herr declared the Convocation to be in order.  The Rev. Dr. James R. Henery, Director of Communications and University Chaplain, led the invocation.  Dr. Loftus welcomed the students and community.

    Student Government Association President Nathaniel Rivas-Blackwell ‘20 spoke to his classmates about being responsible for representing not only the graduating class of 2020, but also the entire student body as a whole in meetings with faculty, staff and community members. “We have a great team of people in SGA that have the ability to see problems as more than just areas for complaints and criticism, but instead as opportunities to get involved in their community and help bring positive change to it as well.”  He listed his goals for the years as renovating Farrago, developing a mentor program that visits Scotland High and local middle schools to help encourage further education and pursuit of personal goals, and increasing St. Andrews presence in the Laurinburg community through community service and sponsorships opportunities with local businesses.

    Dr. Loftus introduced the speaker, St. Andrews Campus President Paul Baldasare Jr. ‘77, as one who has thoroughly invested himself in the life of St. Andrews.  Mr. Baldasare graduated with Honors from St. Andrews Presbyterian College in 1977 and went on to receive his J. D. degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Law, 1980. After a career in law and higher education, he returned in 1997 to St. Andrews to serve as Vice President for Institutional Advancement (1997-2006) and was then chosen as President of St. Andrews in January 2007 and continues in that office today.

    In his convocation speech titled “Lean In,” Mr. Baldasare began with, “I read recently that the poet and Pulitzer Prize winning author, Mary Oliver, offered up real inspiration in her instructions for going to college and living a life when she wrote “Pay Attention, Be Astonished, Talk about it!”  Not bad advice if you ask me!  Well, whatever the advice you received, if you are like I was when I left home to attend St. Andrews way back in 1973, you probably nodded to your parents that you understood, quickly changed the conversation, and said confidently to yourself—I’ve got this covered!  I know exactly what I need to do.  As many times over the years as I’ve welcomed students to St. Andrews, I’ve sworn to myself not to pile on and give advice.  But this year, I ask you to indulge me and let me give some slightly different advice based on 30 years of working in higher education with most of those years here at St. Andrews.”

    Focusing on his title, Mr. Baldasare continued with: “Committing passionately is not passive.  It requires you to actively “lean in” to the experience, in short putting more of yourself into those activities and concerns than other self-serving commitments.  For those of you who are athletes you’ll know that “Leaning in” has a long history in sports to mean putting your weight forward toward someone or something.

    “This concept was popularized recently by Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sanberg in her book by the same title.  Sanberg was writing to encourage women in particular to embrace challenge and take risks; to push past insecurities and fears.  She encourages readers to be bold in the workplace about those things that really matter—the quality of their work, their leadership, their integrity, their place on the team.  In short, make your commitments with passion and energy and that will take you a long way toward getting the most out of your St. Andrews experience,” he said.

    Following the speech, Mr. Cornish began the Community Honor Code Ceremony having all new and transfer students sign pledge cards.  Mr. Sean Moore, Instructor of Music and Accompanist, Mrs. Elizabeth Blair, Assistant Professor of Music, and the St. Andrews Singers leadership team of Gaby Stephens, Gabby Rhodes, Kylie Morgan,Mint Vu and Phillip Alden led the assembly in singing the Alma Mater.  

    With almost 600 students, plus faculty, staff and community members attending, lunch was served both in Harris Courts and Belk.  Classes resumed following lunch.

    (President Baldasare’s speech is available as a pdf.)​

 [Note:  The following release comes from the Chatham County Schools where SA alum Sarah Threatt ’17 is now teaching third grade at Siler Elementary.  She is the district’s nominee for the inaugural North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT) Beginning Teacher of the Year Award.  The release is printed with permission.]

SILER CITY — There was a point during this past school year when some of the third-graders in Sarah Threatt’s classroom hadn’t quite figured out the very handy negotiating tool of disagreeing agreeably. Becky Lane was in the room taking notes. 

    It was Threatt’s first year teaching at Siler City Elementary School. In fact, last school year was her first time running her own classroom. Lane is her New Directions coach. 

    New Directions is a Chatham County Schools initiative that provides mentorship for the district’s educators who are in their first few years of teaching. Threatt so flourished in the program that she is the district’s nominee for the inaugural North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT) Beginning Teacher of the Year Award. It was developed to both honor beginning teachers and retain potentially excellent teachers in North Carolina’s public schools. Threatt is eligible to earn regional distinction and possibly statewide recognition from NCCAT. 

    “She learned very quickly the importance of being well planned each day and the need for positive and productive relationships with all of her students,” said Dr. Larry Savage, the principal at Siler City Elementary. “She also found the balance between seeking and receiving help from her teammates and bringing her own ideas into her classroom. All of these attributes led to outstanding student learning.”

    Back in Threatt’s classroom, where those third-graders needed help with diplomacy, Lane suggested implementing a chart that would guide students toward more productive conversations during group work. Known in education spaces as accountable talk, the concept wasn’t foreign to Threatt. She said she learned about it in college and used it while working as an instructional assistant at Silk Hope School.   

    What Lane did through her coaching, though, was give Threatt a mind to see how the approach would benefit her students at Siler City Elementary. 

“The students just jumped all over it, and they spoke to each other that way,” Threatt said. “But not only in the classroom but outside at recess I could hear them speaking to each other using the sentence starters from the accountable-talk chart. So they took that outside of the classroom.”

    In addition to professional development with Carmen Gaby-Walencik, who is the New Directions site coordinator at Siler City Elementary, the program helped beginning educators at the school gain an appreciation for the particular dynamics there, Threatt said. 

     Threatt said she’s not sure how she would have made it through that first year without Lane, whose classroom visits didn’t come across like formal observations. 

    “She was just there as a mentor,” said Threatt, who also received guidance from Siler City Elementary teacher Tracey Troxler. “The program was very reassuring.”

Published Aug. 29, 2019

Hurricane Dorian Information

2 September 2019, 11:13 am Written by

Update: September 6th, 2019

I’m pleased to report that the St. Andrews University campus escaped harm from Hurricane Dorian.  All students who stayed on campus are fine, food service remains fully functional, and electrical power in the residence halls, all across campus, and at the Equestrian Center was uninterrupted.  The campus had no flooding or wind damage other than partial fencing at the soccer field blown down, and a few limbs and some debris scattered about.

At the Equestrian Center all horses were well protected and safe throughout the night and are doing fine this morning.  A couple of small trees at the Equestrian Center were blown down, but otherwise the Center survived the storm in good shape.  Roads on campus, and in and around campus in Laurinburg, are easily passable with little or no standing water.

The weather this morning is warm, clear and dry.  The sun is shining through light cloud cover, and based on local weather reports there should be clear blue skies by early this afternoon.   The staff is working this morning to clear sandbags and testing systems to make sure everything is fully operational.  Students who left campus before the storm are required to wait until Sunday to return to campus.  Classes will resume at 8:00am on Monday, September 9, 2019. 

Paul Baldasare, ‘77
Campus President

 

Update: September 3rd, 2019

Based on the best information available from the National Hurricane Center, the ultimate path and intensity of Hurricane Dorian as it moves up the east coast still remains uncertain at this time.  In an abundance of caution, we have decided to cancel classes on the St. Andrews campus in Laurinburg on Thursday (9/5) and Friday (9/6).  Classes on Wednesday (9/4) will be on the normal schedule through 3:00pm.  All missed classes on Thursday and Friday will be made up on two Saturdays later in the fall semester.  Classes will resume on their regular schedule on Monday, September 9, 2019 at 8:00am. 

All students are encouraged to leave campus after 3:00pm on Wednesday.  In the event that a student wishes to remain on campus, residence halls will be staffed and food service will continue as usual.  From Wednesday through Sunday, the campus will be dry and a general curfew will be enforced.  Students who elect to remain on campus during this period of time are required to notify the Office of Student Affairs in advance of their intentions to stay on campus.

All staff are expected to work their regular office hours on Thursday and Friday, and all campus administrative offices will be open on the normal schedule unless weather conditions change.

If students have questions or need assistance leaving campus, they should contact Dean of Students Tim Verhey or members of the Office of Student Affairs as soon as possible.  Hurricane updates will continue to be posted by email, social media and on the St. Andrews website.

Paul Baldasare, ‘77
Campus President

 

Update: September 2nd, 2019

The St. Andrews administrative staff has been monitoring Hurricane Dorian since early last week and our physical plant employees have been making preparations in case the storm impacts the campus.

At this point, Hurricane Dorian is moving quite slowly, but is forecasted to pass off the coast of southeastern North Carolina between Wednesday night and Thursday morning.  Even though the storm is expected to stay off the coast, there is the potential for wind and rain in the Laurinburg area.  Keep in mind that the storm’s path can change at any time. So, administrative staff along with local authorities will continue to monitor the progress of Hurricane Dorian throughout the week.  

In the event that we determine it would best to cancel classes, we will provide the campus community with as much advanced notice as possible.  We will provide updates by email and on our website as needed throughout the week. 

Paul Baldasare, Jr., ‘77
Campus President

   St. Andrews University campus-wide Opening Convocation will be held in Harris Courts, Aug. 27, beginning at 11 a.m.

   The event is for all new and returning students, faculty and staff.  St. Andrews also welcomes community members to attend.  New first year and transfer students will be part of the signing of the Community Honor Code Ceremony.  

   Dr. Edna Ann Loftus, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, University Marshal Dr. David Herr and Mr. Loren Cornish, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, will have representative parts in Convocation.  

   Student Government Association president Nathaniel Rivas-Blackwell ‘20

will address his classmates and welcome new students.

   St. Andrews campus president Paul Baldasare Jr. ‘77 is the Convocation speaker and his speech is titled “Lean In.”

   Classes are meeting on the first day (Aug. 27) and will be modified to accommodate the Convocation:  (8-9.15) meets from 8-8.40;  (9.30-10.45) meets from 8.55-9.35;  (11-12.15) meets from 9.50-10.30;  Convocation/lunch 11-1 p.m.;  (12.30-1.45) meets from 1.15-1.55;  (2-3.15) meets from 2.10-2.50;  (2-5) meets from 2.10-5 p.m.  No changes for evening classes.

   Lunch for all who attend begins following Convocation and will be served in both Harris Courts and Belk.​

   St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University.  The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

Belk Tower to be torn down

     

The most visible and recognizable structure on the St. Andrews campus is the Katherine MacKay Belk Bell Tower that is next to the causewalk, half way between the residential and academic sides of Lake Ansley C. Moore.  Last September during Hurricane Florence, the tower was severely damaged and now poses a significant safety risk.

 Based upon strong recommendations from the architects, engineers and safety inspectors, the tower poses such a significant safety risk that it must be torn down as soon as possible and then reconstructed using a more secure and weather resistant construction design. The demolition process will begin August 14 and is expected to be completed by August 23. Reconstruction of a new bell tower will take place after the existing tower has been removed and a more thorough study of the site and a new construction design is completed.

 The cross on top of the tower and the bells inside will be removed first and preserved for future installation on the new tower. According to St. Andrews campus president Paul Baldasare Jr., “Although it is a great disappointment that the bell tower was so severely damaged during Hurricane Florence, everyone should be reassured that the tower will be rebuilt and the bells ringing again as soon as possible.”

 St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International Universitylocated in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

 

Dr. Mary Louise Bringle, who taught Religious Studies and chaired the Humanities and Fine Arts Division at St. Andrews from 1983-2000, is returning to present a lecture as part of the national program NetVUE (Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education).

   Her speech will be in Avinger Auditorium on Monday, August 12, 11 a.m. and is titled "Sustainable Strengths: A Liberating Education for the 21st Century." 

   Dr. Bringle is Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies and coordinator of the Integrated Studies major at Brevard College.  Her Ph.D. in Theological Studies is from Emory University.  She is an award-winning hymn writer, and her original texts and translations are included in multiple collections, including the hymnals of numerous denominations in North America and Scotland.  Dr. Bringle recently served as President of The Hymn Society in the U.S. and Canada and as chair of the committee that created the newest hymnal for the Presbyterian Church USA.  She is a ruling elder at Trinity Presbyterian Church in Hendersonville, NC.

   This lecture will kick off a year long, campus-wide discussion of St Andrews University’s identity, purpose and direction as a college.  Throughout the process, St. Andrews will be considering four questions: 1) What does it mean to be a Presbyterian-related college today?;  2) How do we carry out our commitment as a liberal arts college to educate the whole person?; 3) How must we change in order to remain faithful to our mission in the contemporary context?;  4) How can we engage in relationships of mutual service and support in the wider community? 

   This program is supported by a grant from NetVUE which is a nationwide network of colleges and universities formed to enrich the intellectual and theological exploration of vocation among undergraduate students. Its purposes include deepening the understanding of the intellectual and theological dimensions of vocational exploration and examining the role of vocational exploration in a variety of institutional contexts.  This initiative is administered by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) with generous support from the Lilly Endowment Inc. and members.  St. Andrews University, a Branch of Webber International University, is a member of CIC.