Dr. James Henery

Dr. James Henery

Science Olympiad’s regional competitions

30 March 2019, 8:00 am

   Now in its 35thyear, one of the Science Olympiad’s regional competitions will be held at St. Andrews University on March 30.  Junior high students from nine different school across the Carolinas will compete in events from Anatomy and Physiology to Battery Buggy.  Beginning at 9 a.m., 23 events will be held.  However, the best part of the event is sure to be the awards ceremony.  Teammates from each school excitedly cheer one another on.  The top teams will advance to the state competition held in Raleigh, NC.

   In an effort to gain prospective students, as well as encourage junior high and high school students to get excited about science, the Science Olympiad was born.  On Nov. 23, 1974, 15 schools from across the Carolinas and Virginia traveled to (then) St. Andrews Presbyterian College to compete in the first ever Science Olympiad.  The brainchild of the Division of Natural Science, Mathematics and Health Science, this event promoted fun and learning in areas such as biology, chemistry, physics and engineering.

   Word of this event spread from state to state.  In 1983, John Cairns, a teacher from Delaware, with help from Dr. Gerald Putz, a school district consultant in Michigan, realized the importance of sharing this event with the nation.  Dr. Putz, also a retired Army Lieutenant Colonel, sought funding from the U.S. Army.  After a leadership seminar to determine level of interest, the U.S. Army agreed to sponsor the first ever Science Olympiad National Tournament. It was held in May, 1985, at Michigan State University with 17 states participating. 

   It’s hard to believe that such an exceptional competition got its roots in the U.S. at St. Andrews.  Currently, the Science Olympiad hosts over 450 tournaments a year with over 8,000 teams competing in all 50 states.  This year the National Science Olympiad competition will be held in Ithaca at Cornell University.  Next year the national competition comes home as the event will be hosted by North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

   The love of science runs deep at St. Andrews, from its expansive John Blue Lab to the faculty who meticulously put together science related events.  Rooney Coffman, Director of Logistics, who has seen the evolution of the event over the years, couldn’t be prouder that it continues to foster the love of science in young minds.  It goes to show how a small idea born inLaurinburg can have an enormous impact on the nation.

 

(This release was written by Kaitlyn Lomax, a senior communications major, assisting Dr. Henery as a COM 454 practicum study.)​

  Now in its 35thyear, one of the Science Olympiad’s regional competitions will be held at St. Andrews University on March 30.  Junior high students from nine different school across the Carolinas will compete in events from Anatomy and Physiology to Battery Buggy.  Beginning at 9 a.m., 23 events will be held.  However, the best part of the event is sure to be the awards ceremony.  Teammates from each school excitedly cheer one another on.  The top teams will advance to the state competition held in Raleigh, NC.

   In an effort to gain prospective students, as well as encourage junior high and high school students to get excited about science, the Science Olympiad was born.  On Nov. 23, 1974, 15 schools from across the Carolinas and Virginia traveled to (then) St. Andrews Presbyterian College to compete in the first ever Science Olympiad.  The brainchild of the Division of Natural Science, Mathematics and Health Science, this event promoted fun and learning in areas such as biology, chemistry, physics and engineering.

   Word of this event spread from state to state.  In 1983, John Cairns, a teacher from Delaware, with help from Dr. Gerald Putz, a school district consultant in Michigan, realized the importance of sharing this event with the nation.  Dr. Putz, also a retired Army Lieutenant Colonel, sought funding from the U.S. Army.  After a leadership seminar to determine level of interest, the U.S. Army agreed to sponsor the first ever Science Olympiad National Tournament. It was held in May, 1985, at Michigan State University with 17 states participating. 

   It’s hard to believe that such an exceptional competition got its roots in the U.S. at St. Andrews.  Currently, the Science Olympiad hosts over 450 tournaments a year with over 8,000 teams competing in all 50 states.  This year the National Science Olympiad competition will be held in Ithaca at Cornell University.  Next year the national competition comes home as the event will be hosted by North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

   The love of science runs deep at St. Andrews, from its expansive John Blue Lab to the faculty who meticulously put together science related events.  Rooney Coffman, Director of Logistics, who has seen the evolution of the event over the years, couldn’t be prouder that it continues to foster the love of science in young minds.  It goes to show how a small idea born inLaurinburg can have an enormous impact on the nation.

 

(This release was written by Kaitlyn Lomax, a senior communications major, assisting Dr. Henery as a COM 454 practicum study.)​

St. Andrews University, a branch of Webber International University, was among 24 North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities that competed in the recent Ethics Bowl held Feb. 8-9 at the North Carolina Legislative complex in Raleigh. St. Andrews students collectively explored the theme of “Ethics and the Environment.”  Under the guidance of campus coordinators Dr. Tanner Capps and Dr. Tim Verhey, this debate experience came as part of a St. Andrews Demi I course called “Debating Ethical Dilemmas,” an innovative new class that introduces students to ethical concepts and public argument through teamwork and academic collaboration.  Tharyn French, Kerri Paschal, Lydia Randell, Eduardo Andrade, Timothy Aiken and Steffan Johnson represented St. Andrews.

    “The Ethics Bowl is both academically challenging and personally rewarding experience for our students,” said NCICU president Hope Williams. “Determining ethical responses to complex situations leads to personal awareness and valuable discussion among team members and participating business and community leaders.”

   Each Ethics Bowl team consisted of four-to-six students for the four rounds of competition that last over two days with semi-final and final rounds. Approximately 60 business, non-profit and government professionals served as judges and moderators.

   Participating colleges and universities included Barton College, Belmont Abby College, Campbell University, Catawba College, Chowan University, Gardner-Webb University, High Point University, Johnson C. Smith University,Livingstone College, Louisburg College, Mars Hill University, Meredith College, Montreat College, North Carolina Wesleyan College, Queens University of Charlotte, St. Andrews University, Saint Augustine’s University, Salem College, University of Mount Olive, Wake Forest University, William Peace University and Wingate University

   Ethics Bowl Sponsors included Ads Infinitum, BB&T, BDO USA LLP, Blackman & Sloop CPA, Catering Works, Cherry Bekaert, Melanie Chrisp-Thorpe, Coca-Cola Bottling Co., Colleen Kinser, CORT, Dominion Energy, Duke Energy, Enterprise Holdings, Fidelity Investments, First American Education Finance, HRP, International Textile Group, Ketchum, McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture, Mount Olive Pickle Co., Piedmont Natural Gas, Steve and Liz Riley, SunTrust Bank, Theo Davis Printing, TIAA, Wells Fargo, Hope Williams, and Womble Bond Dickinson.

   St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.—30—

MLK Jr. Day 2019 Celebrated in Avinger Auditorium

28 January 2019, 9:28 am

St. Andrews University Announces Three Major Curriculum Additions

17 January 2019, 9:24 am

   St. Andrews University announces three major curriculum additions to their growing list of majors and degrees beginning with the fall 2019 term.  They are:  Bachelor of Science in Biology with Specialization in Biomedical Sciences;  Bachelor of Arts in Sport Management;  Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Pre-Doctor of Physical Therapy.

   According to Dr. John Knesel, Natural and Life Sciences Department Chair, “We are pleased to be able to offer a more focused major to the increasing number of students who are interested in pursuing a career in medicine.”  A Bachelor of Science in Biology Specialization in Biomedical Sciences will better equip and more clearly focus those students whose primary interests lie in professional programs, e.g., medical schools, as well as programs in the allied health fields. 

   Dr. Knesel lists some of the learning outcomes as:  demonstrate proficiency in biological science commensurate with national undergraduate standards;  understand scientific methodology and being able to employ it in a practical setting;  conduct experiments or making observations in the laboratory or field;  analyze data, formulate hypotheses and draw conclusions.

   Courses will include Genetics, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Organic Chemistry, all with accompanying labs, plus junior and senior seminars.

   The Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Pre-Doctor of Physical Therapy program is designed to provide students interested in the Physical Therapy profession with a clearly delineated undergraduate curriculum that meets all the course requirements for admission to graduate Physical Therapy programs.  The curriculum design follows the recommendations of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) as well as the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) guidelines.

   Dr. Edna Ann Loftus, Academic Dean, says, “While St. Andrews graduates have been admitted to graduate programs in Physical Therapy through our current range of majors, this new interdisciplinary studies major has been designed specifically to prepare students for the Physical Therapy profession.  The St. Andrews program is unique as it combines strong preparation in the sciences with courses in Health Services Administration designed to acquaint students with various aspects of the health care profession.  This feature of the program will enable students to develop leadership and management skills essential to advancement in the Physical Therapy profession.”

   Student learning outcomes for the program include demonstrating proficiency in biological science with an emphasis on the structure and function of the human body;  understanding scientific methodology and be able to employ this methodology in a variety of practical settings;  being introduced to the structure and management of the American healthcare system;  completing a research project that includes 15-20 volunteer hours in a clinical setting meeting APTA standards

   The degree in Bachelor of Arts in Sport Management is a change from what was known as Sports and Recreation Study.  Ms. Pebbles Turbeville, Sport Management Program Chair, said, “We updated the Sport Management curriculum so students have more sports specific information and concepts about the field that can be applied in a variety of positions in the multi-billion dollar sport industry.”

   Changes to learning outcomes include students being able to:  describe and explain the components of the sport management industry such as careers, marketing, risk management, leadership as well as financial and economics principles;  demonstrate skills and knowledge in the area of sport management through internships, practicums or guided independent studies;  apply administrative skills, knowledge and understanding of planning, organizing, as well as evaluating various sporting events and programs.

   Future careers in sport management could be realized in the areas of amateur sports (clubs, youth, college), event management, facility management, ticketing, media, manufacturers and products, retail, sport travel, game operations and community relations.

   New sport management courses will add sport marketing (such as consumers, markets, strategies, sponsorship, as well as products, pricing and promotion) sport funding and finance, sport economics, sport leadership and sport communication including social media.

   Additional information and admissions materials are available from the Admissions Office by calling 910.277.5555 or accessing the university website at sa.edu.

   {St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.  The University's mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core.  Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines.  Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills.

   The university awards degrees at the bachelor and master levels at locations in Florida and North Carolina, as well as at the associate level in Florida.  Traditional classroom, online, and hybrid learning environments are available.  Opportunities exist for students to draw on the courses and programs of study at both locations through online courses and/or periods of residence at either campus.}—30—

 

St. Andrews students and staff increase United Way giving

14 January 2019, 3:40 pm

Scotland County’s recent United Way campaign realized their goal of $280,000 and St. Andrews was not only a positive contributor, but Dr. Elizabeth Hernandez, Assistant Dean of Students, served as the co-chair for the annual campaign. SAU Pledges increased by 32% from 2018 to 2019 and was the highest amount raised by SAU since 2008.

Additionally, St Andrews students and staff provided over 132 hours of service through the United Way in 2018.

United Way supports positive change through 26 impact programs at 18 local nonprofit agencies. Contributions stay local and touch the lives of two out of three residents in Scotland County.

Dr. Hernandez said in the UW website, “We had a great time completing the challenges but most of all, we enjoyed the time spent with our small business owners. It gave us a chance to discuss and remind everyone what the United Way is all about. We really lived United with each other and the small business owners that day." (photo provided by United Way: Liz Hernandez in the second row, second from the right)

Graduating Seniors, MBA's and Parents

21 December 2018, 4:00 pm

Because of Hurricane Florence and our almost three-week late fall semester conclusion, the spring semester is also starting one week later (Jan. 16) which has moved Commencement to one week later, now scheduled for May 11 (a Saturday) and Baccalaureate for May 10 (a Friday).  These changes were communicated in late September and students were notified.

We have recently learned that a major concert is also scheduled in nearby Rockingham for the same weekend and hotels are already being booked.  For example, most rooms in Laurinburg are already reserved.

If you haven’t reserved rooms for Commencement, you can click on the link below to hotels and a complete listing of most accommodations in Scotland and Richmond County, Aberdeen/Southern Pines/Pinehurst, Lumberton and a few South Carolina locations are provided.

The local Hampton has been closed since the hurricane and will probably reopen in late March or April but has not been taking reservations until closer to reopening.  That could be a possibility.

 

Listing of Hotels in the Area

 

 

Dear Students, 

Congratulations on completing (or nearly completing) this long and challenging semester. I hope you all have a wonderful break, enjoying family, friends, and a lot of sleep. Over the holiday, we will be getting ready for your return in January. One change you will notice when you return is a new location for the Dining Hall. The small gym has been less than ideal this semester. So, over the break, we will be moving the mobile kitchen behind Belk (and hopefully getting an additional kitchen). Meals will be served in the Belk Main Room and Knight Life on the top floor of the Belk University Center. This will provide a bit nicer environment and also allow Pioneer Food Service to bring back some of the offerings—like rotisserie chicken—that have not been possible in the small gym. I am excited about this change and think it will be an improvement over what we have been doing this semester. 

On a more long term note, plans are moving along for the renovation of the Dining Hall, Mecklenburg Residence Hall, Morgan Jones, and the Art Studios. A variety of architectural firms have been on campus looking at the buildings in preparation for making bids on the projects. Before too long, the university will select from among these firms and they will begin the design work in preparation for construction to begin. Hopefully early next semester, we will have some drawings to show you of what these spaces will be like after the construction is complete. Then we will all watch with anticipation as construction begins! It will take a while, but I am excited about what the future holds! 

Have a great break! I look forward to welcoming you back to campus in the new year!

Shalom,  

Timothy A. Verhey, Ph.D.
Dean of Students & Professor of Religious Studies and Philosophy
St. Andrews University 
A Branch of Webber International University 
1700 Dogwood Lane
Laurinburg, NC 28352
910-277-5145

Natural and Life Sciences Fall '18 Biology Exposition

11 December 2018, 3:54 pm