Dr. James Henery

Dr. James Henery

   As one of 19 official judges for the 2019 All American Quarter Horse Congress recently held in Columbus, OH, St. Andrews Carla Wennberg was among the elite and nationally recognized equestrian judges to be part of the largest single breed-horse show in the world.
   With over 25,000 horse show entries in various events with 9,000 horses competing and an estimated 650,000 attending the October 5-26 competition, Wennberg was involved with some 13 days of judging without a day off and says she and loved every minute.  “Some days were 12 hours, some 15 hours, all amazing competition.”
   Events and judging included reining and cutting competition, hunter and jumpers, all around events such as horsemanship, showmanship and hunter seat equitation, trail, ranch riding, western pleasure and hunter under saddle.  It has added money classes up to $25,000 for some western performance classes.
   “I have judged the All American QH Congress three times before over my 33-year judging career.  This was my fourth and I will say my favorite.  I judged along with 19 other judges from all over the USA.  I teach a Form to Function course for St Andrews University, and I can tell you there is no better continuing education than on the job.  I appreciate Peggy McElveen having the knowledge that doing an event of this magnitude will bring more to the students and to our equine program.”
   Simply known as the Congress, the event brings in about $409 million in revenue to Columbus and is held on the state fairgrounds with some 14 miles of vendors.
   One can buy anything that involves a horse with a mid-week sale called the Super Sale. This year 114 horses sold, and the top sale was $70,000 for a yearling western pleasure prospect.
   “I am so honored to have work along some of the best judging in the country.  I am so excited to bring my knowledge back to SAU and my equestrian students,” she said.

 

St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

 

 

   The annual St. Andrews Sunday Worship Service at Laurinburg Presbyterian Church will be held Nov. 9, 11 a.m.
   St. Andrews Singers under the direction of Assistant Professor of Music Elizabeth Blair and Music Instructor/Accompanist Sean Moore will be participating, along with Pipe Major Bill Caudill ‘89.
   This year’s guest preacher is the Rev. Dr. Joseph Harvard, now retired having served First Presbyterian Church in Durham for 33 years, and a member of the SA Board of Trustees from 1983-1991.  He has also served as an interim and transitional pastor at various churches.
   During his ministry, he has been active in his community serving as president of Durham Congregations in Action, Sister Cities of Durham, and Chairman of the Board of the Forest at Duke Retirement Community for 15 years. He has also served on the boards of the Lincoln Community Health Center Foundation, Durham Regional Hospital, Senior PharmAssist, Habitat for Humanity, Durham Arts Council, Downtown Durham Inc, the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee of Duke Health System, The Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke, and Urban Ministries of Durham.
   He received the Keeper of the Dream Award from the Martin Luther King Committee, The Elna Spaulding Award, The Freedom Award from the Durham Branch of the NAACP, and the Order of the Long Leaf Pine.  He has joined with other religious and community leaders in seeking to build the Beloved Community in Durham.  In retirement, Joe was the transitional pastor at First Scots Presbyterian Church in Charleston, SC, a neighboring congregation to Mother Emanuel AME Church, for two years.
   Dr. Harvard’s daughter, Rebecca Harvard Barnes, graduated from St. Andrews in 1992 and served on the Alumni Council.

St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

 

 

Nelson shares WW2 items with St. Andrews students

10 October 2019, 3:38 pm

Turning Fellowship into Future

10 October 2019, 3:33 pm

In this role, Dr. Walker joins the board of directors for the national organization whose members include cardiovascular and pulmonary physicians, nurses, exercise physiologists, physical therapists, behavioral scientists, respiratory therapists, dieticians and nutritionists, comprising about 4,000 members.  There are approximately 3500 cardiopulmonary rehab programs across the United States consisting of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals. 

Strategic Partners include The American Association for Respiratory Care, The American College of Cardiology, The American College of Sports Medicine, The American Heart Association, The American Thoracic Society, The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and The Medical Fitness Association.

Dr. Walker said, “For most of my career, I have been involved in the world of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation as an exercise physiologist.  I am thrilled for the opportunity to serve and give back to field that has been so good to me over the years. What is exciting is the real possibility of some of our sports performance, health, and fitness majors working in the field of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.” 

Founded in 1985, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation is dedicated to the mission of reducing morbidity, mortality and disability from cardiovascular and pulmonary disease through education, prevention, rehabilitation, research and disease management.  Central to the core mission is improvement in quality of life for patients and their families. 

St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University located in Laurinburg, NC.   The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

 

St. Andrews Celebrating Constitution Day—Sept. 17, 2019

16 September 2019, 10:09 am

Appropriately, every Sept. 17 brings us to a national recognition of Constitution Day (once known as Citizenship Day) to celebrate the signing of the United States Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787.  Four years later, Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights and the first 10 Amendments were ratified (now 27).

The Constitution includes the Preamble, seven Articles with multiple sections, 4,400 words in total.  It is the oldest and shortest written Constitution of any major government in the world.  Since its creation, over 100 countries around the world have used it as a model for their own.

Since 1952, the Constitution has been on display in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.  Currently, all four pages are displayed behind protective glass framed with titanium.  To preserve the parchment's quality, the cases contain argon gas and are kept at 67 degrees Fahrenheit with a relative humidity of 40 percent.

James Madison proposed the U.S. Bill of Rights.  It largely responded to the Constitution's influential opponents, including prominent Founding Fathers, who argued that the Constitution should not be ratified because it failed to protect the basic principles of human liberty.  The U.S. Bill of Rights was influenced by George Mason's 1776 Virginia Declaration of Rights, the 1689 English Bill of Rights, works of the Age of Enlightenment pertaining to natural rights, and earlier English political documents such as the Magna Carta (1215).

Two additional articles were proposed to the States;  only the final 10 articles were ratified quickly and correspond to the First through Tenth Amendments to the Constitution.  The first Article, dealing with the number and apportionment of U.S. Representatives, never became part of the Constitution.  The second Article, limiting the ability of Congress to increase the salaries of its members, was ratified two centuries later as the 27th Amendment.

Though they are incorporated into the document known as the "Bill of Rights," neither article establishes a right as that term is used today.  For that reason, and also because the term had been applied to the first 10 Amendments long before the 27th Amendment was ratified, the term "Bill of Rights" in modern U.S. usage means only the 10 Amendments ratified in 1791.

One of the original 14 copies of the U.S. Bill of Rights is on public display at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

 

A few facts about the U.S. Constitution

  • Of the spelling errors in the Constitution, "Pensylvania" above the signers' names is probably the most glaring.
  • Thomas Jefferson did not sign the Constitution. He was in France during the Convention, where he served as the U.S. minister. John Adams was serving as the U.S. minister to Great Britain during the Constitutional Convention and did not attend either.
  • The Constitution was "penned" by Jacob Shallus, a Pennsylvania General Assembly clerk, for $30 (about $830 today).
  • The Constitution does not set forth requirements for the right to vote. As a result, at the outset of the Union, only male property-owners could vote. African Americans were not considered citizens, and women were excluded from the electoral process.  Native Americans were not given the right to vote until 1924.
  • James Madison, "the father of the Constitution," was one of the first to arrive in Philadelphia for the Constitutional Convention. He arrived in early May, bearing the blueprint for the new Constitution.

 

The 39 Signers and state each came from:

    St. Andrews, a branch of Webber International University, held their opening Convocation on Aug. 27 as a campus wide and community gathering on the first day of classes and kicked off the beginning of the 2019-2020 academic year. Harris Courts was filled with new students marching in, surrounded by hundreds of returning students, faculty, staff and community members.

    Students began assembling in front of Belk led by Pipe Major Bill Caudill and escorted by St. Andrews ​Marshal Dr. David Herr, Academic Dean Dr. Edna Ann Loftus, Mr. Loren Cornish, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Paul Baldasare Jr, Campus President.

    Dr. Herr declared the Convocation to be in order.  The Rev. Dr. James R. Henery, Director of Communications and University Chaplain, led the invocation.  Dr. Loftus welcomed the students and community.

    Student Government Association President Nathaniel Rivas-Blackwell ‘20 spoke to his classmates about being responsible for representing not only the graduating class of 2020, but also the entire student body as a whole in meetings with faculty, staff and community members. “We have a great team of people in SGA that have the ability to see problems as more than just areas for complaints and criticism, but instead as opportunities to get involved in their community and help bring positive change to it as well.”  He listed his goals for the years as renovating Farrago, developing a mentor program that visits Scotland High and local middle schools to help encourage further education and pursuit of personal goals, and increasing St. Andrews presence in the Laurinburg community through community service and sponsorships opportunities with local businesses.

    Dr. Loftus introduced the speaker, St. Andrews Campus President Paul Baldasare Jr. ‘77, as one who has thoroughly invested himself in the life of St. Andrews.  Mr. Baldasare graduated with Honors from St. Andrews Presbyterian College in 1977 and went on to receive his J. D. degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Law, 1980. After a career in law and higher education, he returned in 1997 to St. Andrews to serve as Vice President for Institutional Advancement (1997-2006) and was then chosen as President of St. Andrews in January 2007 and continues in that office today.

    In his convocation speech titled “Lean In,” Mr. Baldasare began with, “I read recently that the poet and Pulitzer Prize winning author, Mary Oliver, offered up real inspiration in her instructions for going to college and living a life when she wrote “Pay Attention, Be Astonished, Talk about it!”  Not bad advice if you ask me!  Well, whatever the advice you received, if you are like I was when I left home to attend St. Andrews way back in 1973, you probably nodded to your parents that you understood, quickly changed the conversation, and said confidently to yourself—I’ve got this covered!  I know exactly what I need to do.  As many times over the years as I’ve welcomed students to St. Andrews, I’ve sworn to myself not to pile on and give advice.  But this year, I ask you to indulge me and let me give some slightly different advice based on 30 years of working in higher education with most of those years here at St. Andrews.”

    Focusing on his title, Mr. Baldasare continued with: “Committing passionately is not passive.  It requires you to actively “lean in” to the experience, in short putting more of yourself into those activities and concerns than other self-serving commitments.  For those of you who are athletes you’ll know that “Leaning in” has a long history in sports to mean putting your weight forward toward someone or something.

    “This concept was popularized recently by Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sanberg in her book by the same title.  Sanberg was writing to encourage women in particular to embrace challenge and take risks; to push past insecurities and fears.  She encourages readers to be bold in the workplace about those things that really matter—the quality of their work, their leadership, their integrity, their place on the team.  In short, make your commitments with passion and energy and that will take you a long way toward getting the most out of your St. Andrews experience,” he said.

    Following the speech, Mr. Cornish began the Community Honor Code Ceremony having all new and transfer students sign pledge cards.  Mr. Sean Moore, Instructor of Music and Accompanist, Mrs. Elizabeth Blair, Assistant Professor of Music, and the St. Andrews Singers leadership team of Gaby Stephens, Gabby Rhodes, Kylie Morgan,Mint Vu and Phillip Alden led the assembly in singing the Alma Mater.  

    With almost 600 students, plus faculty, staff and community members attending, lunch was served both in Harris Courts and Belk.  Classes resumed following lunch.

    (President Baldasare’s speech is available as a pdf.)​

Sarah Threatt ’17 nominated for Beginning Teacher of Year Award

2 September 2019, 11:42 am

 [Note:  The following release comes from the Chatham County Schools where SA alum Sarah Threatt ’17 is now teaching third grade at Siler Elementary.  She is the district’s nominee for the inaugural North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT) Beginning Teacher of the Year Award.  The release is printed with permission.]

SILER CITY — There was a point during this past school year when some of the third-graders in Sarah Threatt’s classroom hadn’t quite figured out the very handy negotiating tool of disagreeing agreeably. Becky Lane was in the room taking notes. 

    It was Threatt’s first year teaching at Siler City Elementary School. In fact, last school year was her first time running her own classroom. Lane is her New Directions coach. 

    New Directions is a Chatham County Schools initiative that provides mentorship for the district’s educators who are in their first few years of teaching. Threatt so flourished in the program that she is the district’s nominee for the inaugural North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT) Beginning Teacher of the Year Award. It was developed to both honor beginning teachers and retain potentially excellent teachers in North Carolina’s public schools. Threatt is eligible to earn regional distinction and possibly statewide recognition from NCCAT. 

    “She learned very quickly the importance of being well planned each day and the need for positive and productive relationships with all of her students,” said Dr. Larry Savage, the principal at Siler City Elementary. “She also found the balance between seeking and receiving help from her teammates and bringing her own ideas into her classroom. All of these attributes led to outstanding student learning.”

    Back in Threatt’s classroom, where those third-graders needed help with diplomacy, Lane suggested implementing a chart that would guide students toward more productive conversations during group work. Known in education spaces as accountable talk, the concept wasn’t foreign to Threatt. She said she learned about it in college and used it while working as an instructional assistant at Silk Hope School.   

    What Lane did through her coaching, though, was give Threatt a mind to see how the approach would benefit her students at Siler City Elementary. 

“The students just jumped all over it, and they spoke to each other that way,” Threatt said. “But not only in the classroom but outside at recess I could hear them speaking to each other using the sentence starters from the accountable-talk chart. So they took that outside of the classroom.”

    In addition to professional development with Carmen Gaby-Walencik, who is the New Directions site coordinator at Siler City Elementary, the program helped beginning educators at the school gain an appreciation for the particular dynamics there, Threatt said. 

     Threatt said she’s not sure how she would have made it through that first year without Lane, whose classroom visits didn’t come across like formal observations. 

    “She was just there as a mentor,” said Threatt, who also received guidance from Siler City Elementary teacher Tracey Troxler. “The program was very reassuring.”

Published Aug. 29, 2019

Opening Convocation is Aug. 27, 11 a.m., in Harris Courts

19 August 2019, 9:41 am

   St. Andrews University campus-wide Opening Convocation will be held in Harris Courts, Aug. 27, beginning at 11 a.m.

   The event is for all new and returning students, faculty and staff.  St. Andrews also welcomes community members to attend.  New first year and transfer students will be part of the signing of the Community Honor Code Ceremony.  

   Dr. Edna Ann Loftus, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean, University Marshal Dr. David Herr and Mr. Loren Cornish, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, will have representative parts in Convocation.  

   Student Government Association president Nathaniel Rivas-Blackwell ‘20

will address his classmates and welcome new students.

   St. Andrews campus president Paul Baldasare Jr. ‘77 is the Convocation speaker and his speech is titled “Lean In.”

   Classes are meeting on the first day (Aug. 27) and will be modified to accommodate the Convocation:  (8-9.15) meets from 8-8.40;  (9.30-10.45) meets from 8.55-9.35;  (11-12.15) meets from 9.50-10.30;  Convocation/lunch 11-1 p.m.;  (12.30-1.45) meets from 1.15-1.55;  (2-3.15) meets from 2.10-2.50;  (2-5) meets from 2.10-5 p.m.  No changes for evening classes.

   Lunch for all who attend begins following Convocation and will be served in both Harris Courts and Belk.​

   St. Andrews University is a branch of Webber International University.  The University’s mission is to offer students an array of business, liberal arts and sciences, and pre-professional programs of study that create a life transforming educational opportunity which is practical in its application, global in its scope, and multi-disciplinary in its general education core. Students will acquire depth of knowledge and expertise in their chosen field of study, balanced by breadth of knowledge across various disciplines, while pursuing a degree at associate, bachelor, or master level. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing oral and written communication, and critical thinking skills. The international quality of the student body enriches personal experience and promotes understanding of international cultures and influences. Through an atmosphere in which self-discipline, creativity and cultivation of ethical standards are enhanced, the University is dedicated to teaching its students the “how to learn, how to think, and how to apply method” to each new challenge.

Dr. Mary Louise Bringle, who taught Religious Studies and chaired the Humanities and Fine Arts Division at St. Andrews from 1983-2000, is returning to present a lecture as part of the national program NetVUE (Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education).

   Her speech will be in Avinger Auditorium on Monday, August 12, 11 a.m. and is titled "Sustainable Strengths: A Liberating Education for the 21st Century." 

   Dr. Bringle is Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies and coordinator of the Integrated Studies major at Brevard College.  Her Ph.D. in Theological Studies is from Emory University.  She is an award-winning hymn writer, and her original texts and translations are included in multiple collections, including the hymnals of numerous denominations in North America and Scotland.  Dr. Bringle recently served as President of The Hymn Society in the U.S. and Canada and as chair of the committee that created the newest hymnal for the Presbyterian Church USA.  She is a ruling elder at Trinity Presbyterian Church in Hendersonville, NC.

   This lecture will kick off a year long, campus-wide discussion of St Andrews University’s identity, purpose and direction as a college.  Throughout the process, St. Andrews will be considering four questions: 1) What does it mean to be a Presbyterian-related college today?;  2) How do we carry out our commitment as a liberal arts college to educate the whole person?; 3) How must we change in order to remain faithful to our mission in the contemporary context?;  4) How can we engage in relationships of mutual service and support in the wider community? 

   This program is supported by a grant from NetVUE which is a nationwide network of colleges and universities formed to enrich the intellectual and theological exploration of vocation among undergraduate students. Its purposes include deepening the understanding of the intellectual and theological dimensions of vocational exploration and examining the role of vocational exploration in a variety of institutional contexts.  This initiative is administered by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) with generous support from the Lilly Endowment Inc. and members.  St. Andrews University, a Branch of Webber International University, is a member of CIC.